Dake-Kimi 嶽きみ

Have you ever heard of dake-kimi?  If you live in Aomori the name might sound familiar, but it’s most easily recognizable in Hirosaki! Kimi is the Tsugaru word for tomorokoshi, meaning corn. Dake is the name of the district at the foot of Mt. Iwaki. So in short Dake-kimi means corn grown and harvested in … Continue reading Dake-Kimi 嶽きみ

Goshogawara Tachineputa Festival

It’s been a year since I first moved to Japan for the JET Programme. The first thing I got to experience in Aomori was Nebuta. Even though I arrived too late to see Hirosaki Neputa and Aomori City Nebuta, I was lucky to catch Goshogawara Tachineputa.  First I want to talk a little bit about … Continue reading Goshogawara Tachineputa Festival

Oyama Sankei (お山参詣)

On January 1984, Oyama Sankei became a national significant intangible folk cultural asset in Japan. No one really knows when this festival began, and there is much debate whether it started in the Kamakura period or the Edo period. Regardless, it is safe to assume that this festival started a really long time ago, but … Continue reading Oyama Sankei (お山参詣)

Tsugaru-ben (津軽弁)

Tsugaru-ben is the local dialect spoken in the Tsugaru region of Western Aomori. Aomori Prefecture is unique in that there isn't just one dialect for the whole prefecture, but in fact there are three well known dialects: Shimokita-ben (下北弁), Nanbu-ben(南部弁), and Tsugaru-ben(津軽弁) . Tsugaru-ben is probably the most famous dialect of the three. Tsugaru-ben is … Continue reading Tsugaru-ben (津軽弁)